News

While eco-lightbulbs, tiny homes and bans on single-use plastic bags nibble at the edges of our profligate ways, ecological and social sustainability is beginning to profoundly challenge long-standing death styles. This collection brings together new scholarship on multiple and innovative changes to managing the dead from around the world, including the USA, Poland, the Netherlands, […]

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This year, we are happy to be welcoming 16 Mandarin Learning Assistants (MLAs) who will be placed in schools across the South Island and Christchurch. We are currently looking for  2 or 3 homestay families in Christchurch who might be able to host an MLA for 2023.  Should you know of anyone or require further […]

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To celebrate receiving almost 200 applications to enrol from excited students up and down Aotearoa, we invited Newshub’s Kaysha Brownlie to take a sneak peek at Ōtākaro, the future DSC education hub and the first building scheduled for delivery under the first phase of campus redevelopment.

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Mike Grimshaw (Sociology) has been asked to again do the chapter on election cartoons for the 2023 election book and post-election conference. As he did for the 2020 election book, “Politics in a Pandemic” he will be documenting the cartoons (from a range of cartoonists) produced for the election and providing a narrative about the […]

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Mike Grimshaw’s  paper, “On Canaries, Icebergs and the public sphere: The pragmatic compromise of religious pluralism” was published in the Indonesian journal Khazanah Theologia. As our societies become increasingly religiously and culturally diverse, there is a growing sense amongst many, including religious people and thinkers, that the old multi-cultural options may need to be either […]

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Published paper in the journal Acta Analytica entitled “The Cogito, Dreamt Characters, and Unreal Existence”. It’s on self-knowledge and certainty in Descartes’ Meditations and Borges’ The Circular Ruins. Available open access here: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12136-023-00543-6 Abstract: Borges’ The Circular Ruins tells the story of a magician who turns out to be a character in a dream. Leibowitz (2021) argues that […]

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UC Historian, David Monger, has recently published the open-access article ‘Speaking to or for the world? Britain, presumed authority and world opinion at the start of the First World War’ online in the journal Historical Research. The article takes a close look at an under-studied text, the 1914 charity book, edited by the novelist Hall […]

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Richard Bullen (Art History) and James Beattie (Victoria) have curated the exhibition: ‘Wars, Revolutions and Social Change: 60 Years in China’, a collaboration between Canterbury Museum and the Macmillan Brown Library. The exhibition presents the history of twentieth-century China through items gifted to Canterbury Museum by Rewi Alley, and archives from the Macmillan Brown Library. […]

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In the School of Music, Associate Professor Justin DeHart was recently awarded $60,000 from Creative New Zealand to commission six NZ composers to write solo percussion works for him in 2023. Composers include John Psathas, Gillian Whitehead, Phil Brownlee, Leonie Holmes, Michael Norris, and our own School of Music Lecturer, Hamish Oliver. This year was […]

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Paul Millar (English) received the Royal Society’s Pou Aronui Award for distinguished service to aronui-humanities, especially for his commitment to growing capacity and expertise in the digital humanities in Aotearoa New Zealand. This major achievement was recognised at an awards ceremony in Wellington on Tuesday 22 November. Read about Paul’s achievement and the award here.

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The University of Canterbury are delighted to welcome Jonathan Ogilvie ‘home’ to Ōtautahi Christchurch, as the university hosts the writer/director’s ‘Head South’ as its first film in residence.

Set in 1970’s Christchurch, ‘Head South’ is a semi-autobiographical music drama featuring Australian actor Ed Oxenbould, Kiwi singer Benee and iconic character actor [and former UC student], Marton Csokas.

Supporting ‘Head South’ is a fantastic demonstration of the commitment from UC’s Digital Screen Campus programme to further bridge the gap between industry and academia, and is a uniquely valuable experience ahead of welcoming our first cohort of Bachelor of Digital Screen (Hons) students in 2023.

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University of Canterbury student Liam Oliver is packing a van full of ‘giant heavy metal gongs and xylophones’ as UC’s Gamelan ensemble prepares for New Zealand’s only drum festival. Liam’s playing with the Persian music group as well.

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The team at the Macmillan Brown Library have been working on developing a website showing printed material produced by University of Canterbury staff and students. UC in Print: https://digitalvoyages.canterbury.ac.nz/omeka-s/s/uc-in-print/page/welcome  is a site which includes a number of student (e.g. CANTA) and staff (e.g. Chronicle) publications that offer a unique window into the history of the […]

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Views

AI writing tools are free, easy to use and already everywhere. But is it cheating to use them to help write an essay? Shanti Mathias spoke to New Zealand academics about AI’s place in education.

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A new study identifying regions around the world where people are most at risk from flooding caused by melting glaciers could help save vulnerable lives.

“Continued ice loss and expansion of glacial lakes due to climate change means glacial outburst floods are a globally important natural hazard that requires urgent attention to minimise future loss of life.”

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For the University of Canterbury’s Chelsea Rapp, the ability to ‘spin a yarn’ is more than an enviable talent, it’s a valuable professional skill.

In addition to being one of the oldest tools of human civilization, storytelling is a powerful instrument of modern innovation that allows us to better understand things we know little about and help us make sense of the world around us.

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Climate expert University of Canterbury Professor Bronwyn Hayward told RNZ’s Morning Report the outcome of COP27 was very concerning: “It’s been a very bitter, divisive, chaotic COP.” Professor Hayward said the effect a loss and damages fund would have could not be ignored, and while significant, more needed to be done

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Government leaders, policymakers and activists will attend the latest UN #climatechange conference in Egypt. “As a political scientist, I am very concerned about the precarious position of international climate negotiations going into COP27,” says University of Canterbury political scientist Professor Bronwyn Hayward. “In a highly distracted and dangerous world, still coping with the ongoing effects of global pandemic and its economic and social impacts, there is little visible political leadership among governments of the Global North to galvanise international cooperation for climate action.”

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Alex Tan, political science professor who specialises in Asian politics at Canterbury University, told AM on Tuesday the language used by Xi in his speeches shows China is worried about the global economic situation. “The language that is being used in the speeches and in his speech particularly acknowledges China’s concern about global economic volatility, the global political situation from Ukraine all the way to our region [New Zealand],” Tan told AM fill-in co-host Patrick Gower.  “The emphasis on those securities is two parts. It’s the traditional military security concerns and national security concerns, but also the economic security concerns.” Tan believes China won’t invade Taiwan in the next five years.

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New Zealand history is Māori history first and foremost, so why is Aotearoa New Zealand history often examined in connection to Britain and colonisation? University of Canterbury Aotahi Historian Dr Madi Williams reframes ‘medieval’ Aotearoa & Polynesia in her free livestreamed Tauhere UC Connect public talk

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University of Canterbury Chinese politics expert Professor Anne-Marie Brady spoke to RNZ’s Perlina Lau about the significance of the recent face-to-face meeting of the presidents of China and Russia

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History Professor Katie Pickles talk to RNZ about Queen Elizabeth II’s relationship with Aotearoa New Zealand, and how the reigns of both Queen Elizabeth and her great-grandmother Queen Victoria helped raise women’s status.

“They really are the standout monarchs of the past 200 years, of modern times. They’ve very much been queens in every sense.”

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As we prepare for a more turbulent future driven by climate change, our traditional response to disasters is no longer enough. We need to address the underlying causes that make some communities more vulnerable than others and learn lessons from past disasters. Read more from University of Canterbury Lecturer Dr Shinya Uekusa, Massey University Professor Bruce Glavovic and University of Auckland Professor Steve Matthewman in a new article on The Conversation

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Mike Grimshaw (sociology) has an article “Is the centre neoliberal?”  in the on-line magazine The Philosophical Salon– published by the LA Review of Books Channels project. https://thephilosophicalsalon.com/is-the-center-neoliberal/

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As conservationist @JaneGoodallInst turns plastic in Barbie’s ‘inspiring women’ series, @UCNZ Historian Professor Katie Pickles explains why the appropriation of heroic women of substance as dolls should not surprise us @UCNZArts @ConversationEDU

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The 51st Pacific Islands Forum is the first time Pacific leaders have gathered since the pandemic began and one of the most significant forums in many years. University of Canterbury Distinguished Professor Steven Ratuva talks to RNZ about Kiribati’s withdrawal from the Forum and some of the issues due to be discussed, including climate change and the 2050 Strategy for the Blue Pacific Continent.

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Events

Can the path to a sustainable future be found in the past? Find out about the research behind ecosystems, water science and Pacific sustainability from international experts at the free Tauhere UC Connect panel discussion, The Path to a Sustainable Future, livestreamed and in-person.

7pm – 8.30pm, Tuesday 7 February 2023, at The Piano, Christchurch

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Conor Clarke is part of a group exhibition opening in Dunedin on 12 November.

Vital Machinery brings together recent works by five Aotearoa New Zealand contemporary artists working across photography and moving image. Diverse in form and approach, the intersections of these five bodies of work create space for new thinking – opening up ways to consider histories of lens-based art practices, relationships between artist and subject, and the consumption, agency and stability of the image in a digital age.

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Coffee and Classics is a regular morning tea for members of PhiloLogie. This month, Associate Professor Victor Parker will discuss his recent research into the use of elephants in the ancient world. To illustrate the talk, Victor will examine a series of coins which feature images of elephants. To attend, please RSVP to terri.elder@canterbury.ac.nz Coffee […]

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Please register for (De)Constructing Minorities and Freedoms, which will take place at UC’s Ilam Campus and Ōnuku Marae from 7-9 December. This conference is free for those who wish to attend both in person and online; however, please register for catering and transportation purposes (including to and from Ōnuku marae on 8 Dec.). Numbers are limited, so please register by 10 November.

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University of Canterbury and Christchurch City Council present Tītohu Tūroa | Sustainability Showcase on 28 October: Sustainability research + action for Ōtautahi Christchurch.

Special guest speakers:

  • Dr Rod Carr, Chairperson, Climate Change Commission, on ‘Carbon Rush: Can Canterbury cash in on the changing Climate?
  • Professor Te Maire Tau, Ngāi Tahu Centre, on ‘Whakaora te Awa | River Restoration’
  • Malcolm Johns, Chief Executive, Christchurch International Airport Ltd, on ‘Carbon, Ambition & Reality’

Free, attend online or in person, book here https://bit.ly/3Dg30SH

 

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Tuesday November 29. 6.00pm This  event features a conversation with Brett Birquist UC Amokapua | Assistant Vice Chancellor Engagement and Philip Aldridge CE of the Te Matatiki Toi Ora The Arts Centre of Christchurch. As both organisations look to celebrate milestone anniversaries in 2023, Brett & Philip will discuss how we celebrate such milestones, acknowledging […]

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Join CEO of the Christchurch Symphony Orchestra as he talks about community engagement, the place of heritage art forms in modern culture, and his research into effective community music leadership.  Tickets here: https://events.humanitix.com/an-evening-with-dr-graham-sattler  

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Tuesday November 8, 6.00pm This  event features staff and interns from WORD Christchurch in conversation  with Senior Lecturer Erin Harrington. Join Steph Walker (WORD Executive  Director), Kiran Dass (WORD Programme Manager), and Tessa Boraston (UC Student Programmer) as they discuss words in all their forms, the roles of festivals in today’s society, and the evolution […]

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Later this month Associate Professor Alison Griffith is giving a free public talk at Tūranga Central Library on ‘Verginia and Nga Roimata’. Alison will discuss the Roman legend of Verginia in parallel with the (oral) historical account of Roimata, the daughter of the Ngai Tahu chief Tamaiharanui. This talk is one of a series organised […]

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Coffee and Classics is a regular morning tea for members of PhiloLogie, Classoc and guests. This month, Associate Professor Enrica Sciarrino will discuss images of Ulysses in Dante’s The Divine Comedy. To illustrate the talk, we will examine two special editions of Dante from the UC Rare Books Collection, illustrated by Gustav Doré. To attend, please RSVP to terri.elder@canterbury.ac.nz   […]

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An Analysis of Thomas Chippendale’s 1754 Furniture Designs Dr Florian Knothe, University of Hong Kong Erskine Visiting Teaching Fellow, hosted by the Department of Art History and Theory Tuesday 18 October, 10am – Karl Popper 612, University of Canterbury To highlight the significance of this cultural transfer and re-interpretation, my paper focuses on one particular […]

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